Accessorizing For Interviews

We’ve all been there. It’s the night before the big interview and you’re planning your wardrobe for the next day. But as you lay out your outfit you wonder…are these earrings too much? Is that necklace too chunky? What do these pieces say about you?

Here are some dos and don’ts to making a great first impression:

1. DO think about the role you are interviewing for. Not every job has the same dress code or the same office dynamic. If you are interviewing at a law firm, classic jewelry is a better choice than bold, oversized styles. However, those colorful pieces might be the perfect complement to an outfit for a more creative role.

2. DON’T wear jewelry that distracts from what you’re saying. Wearing bangles or earrings that make a lot of noise will take the focus off your answers to the interview questions. Don’t let a hiring manager miss your most important point or best idea because they can’t focus on your words.

3.  DO draw attention to your face.  Large earrings or a chunky necklace might not make a lot of noise, but they can definitely attract the eye and take the interviewer’s gaze away.  Instead, try smaller styles or necklaces with a single focal point like a locket or pendant to draw the eye upward, keeping the attention on you and what you are discussing.

4.  DON’T wear pieces that are too “well-loved.” It’s one thing to hold onto a necklace that’s missing a stone (although we can certainly fix that for you).  It’s another to go to an interview wearing it.  This is your only chance to make a first impression, and you want them to know you are taking it seriously. While a damaged bracelet may not be the deciding factor in who gets the job, it could cause a hiring manager to think you are not as poised and professional as another candidate who didn’t show any obvious flaws in his or her wardrobe choices.

5.  DO wear what you’re comfortable wearing.  If you’re not used to wearing rings or necklaces, you might accidentally end up playing with the pieces you have on because you’re nervous.  It’s better to err on the side of “less is more” than to create a negative impression of your ability to focus or your interest level in the role.

Need a little polish or jewelry touch up? Send it over to us now for a little love!

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